Released on Sep 4, 2019

Updated Barrett's Guideline Aims to Improve Patient Outcomes

DOWNERS GROVE, Ill. -- September 4, 2019 -- The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has released its updated “ASGE guideline on screening and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus,” published in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

The guideline aims to help clinicians understand the published literature and quality of available data on screening and surveillance in patients with Barrett’s esophagus; a precancerous condition for esophageal adenocarcinoma. This document addresses several key clinical issues in this field, including the role and impact of screening and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus. As with other types of cancer, identifying this precancerous condition and early changes of cancer provides the best chance of successful treatment and, ultimately, improves patient outcomes.

Several endoscopic procedures and related technologies are used to screen and monitor patients with known or suspected Barrett’s esophagus. If changes are found in the cells lining the esophagus, various endoscopic treatment approaches are available.

This guideline addresses the utility of advanced imaging and sampling modalities used during screening and surveillance endoscopic procedures and includes chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, wide-area transepithelial sampling (WATS) and others. Table 4 contains a summary of the recommendations.

The document complies with the standards of guideline development set forth by the Institute of Medicine for the creation of trustworthy guidelines and provides recommendations based on the GRADE framework.

“We are hopeful that this current information will help guide clinicians in using the growing array of tools and technologies available to us to diagnose and manage Barrett’s esophagus, which, in turn, has the potential to significantly impact patient outcomes,” said Sachin Wani, MD, FASGE, Chair of the ASGE Standards of Practice Committee.

The full guideline is available at https://www.giejournal.org/article/S0016-5107(19)31704-3/fulltext .

A related Technology Status Evaluation Report from ASGE, also in the September issue of GIE, details the various screening modalities. https://www.giejournal.org/article/S0016-5107(19)31678-5/fulltext

For more information about Barrett’s esophagus, visit ASGE.org.

 

 


About Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures allow the gastroenterologist to visually inspect the upper gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach and duodenum) and the lower bowel (colon and rectum) through an endoscope, a thin, flexible device with a lighted end and a powerful lens system. Endoscopy has been a major advance in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. For example, the use of endoscopes allows the detection of ulcers, cancers, polyps and sites of internal bleeding. Through endoscopy, tissue samples (biopsies) may be obtained, areas of blockage can be opened and active bleeding can be stopped. Polyps in the colon can be removed, which has been shown to prevent colon cancer.

About the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Since its founding in 1941, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has been dedicated to advancing patient care and digestive health by promoting excellence and innovation in gastrointestinal endoscopy. ASGE, with more than 15,000 members worldwide, promotes the highest standards for endoscopic training and practice, fosters endoscopic research, recognizes distinguished contributions to endoscopy, and is the foremost resource for endoscopic education. Visit www.asge.org and www.screen4coloncancer.org for more information and to find a qualified doctor in your area.

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
3300 Woodcreek Drive Downers Grove, IL 60515
P (630) 573-0600
F (630) 963-8332
 www.asge.org
 www.screen4coloncancer.org

Media Contact

Gina Steiner
Director of Communications
630.570.5635;gsteiner@asge.org