Released on Jan 14, 2022

CMS Guidance on COVID-19 Healthcare Worker Vaccination: Healthcare Facilities In all States Must Comply

On January 13 the U.S. Supreme Court upheld emergency regulation, The Omnibus COVID-19 Health Care Staff Vaccination Interim Final Rule, published by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) on November 5, 2021, requiring vaccination for workers in facilities that participate in Medicare and Medicaid. The staff vaccination requirement applies to the Medicare and Medicaid-certified outpatient provider and supplier types including Ambulatory Surgery Centers. 

As a result of the Supreme Court decision, health care providers subject to the Omnibus Health Care Staff Vaccination rule in the 24 states (Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming) covered by this decision will now need to establish plans and procedures to ensure their staff are vaccinated and to have their employees receive at least the first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

The Supreme Court decision does not affect compliance timelines for providers in the District of Columbia, the territories, and the 25 states with a preliminary injunction in place. See the guidance released on December 28, 2021, for additional information.

Facilities covered by this regulation must establish a policy ensuring all eligible staff have received the first dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine or a one-dose COVID-19 vaccine prior to providing any care, treatment, or other services by January 27, 30 days following the publication of the guidance. All eligible staff must have received the necessary shots to be fully vaccinated – either two doses of Pfizer or Moderna or one dose of Johnson & Johnson – by February 28, 60 days following the publication of the guidance.

 

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About Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures allow the gastroenterologist to visually inspect the upper gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach and duodenum) and the lower bowel (colon and rectum) through an endoscope, a thin, flexible device with a lighted end and a powerful lens system. Endoscopy has been a major advance in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases. For example, the use of endoscopes allows the detection of ulcers, cancers, polyps and sites of internal bleeding. Through endoscopy, tissue samples (biopsies) may be obtained, areas of blockage can be opened and active bleeding can be stopped. Polyps in the colon can be removed, which has been shown to prevent colon cancer.

About the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Since its founding in 1941, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has been dedicated to advancing patient care and digestive health by promoting excellence and innovation in gastrointestinal endoscopy. ASGE, with almost 15,000 members worldwide, promotes the highest standards for endoscopic training and practice, fosters endoscopic research, recognizes distinguished contributions to endoscopy, and is the foremost resource for endoscopic education. Visit Asge.org and ValueOfColonoscopy.org for more information and to find a qualified doctor in your area.

 

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
3300 Woodcreek Drive Downers Grove, IL 60515
P (630) 573-0600
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 www.asge.org
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Media Contact

Andrea Lee
Director of Marketing and Communications
630.570.5603
ALee@asge.org