Key Resources


ASGE Guidelines

ASGE evidence-based guidelines provide clinicians with recommendations for the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of patients undergoing endoscopic procedures of the digestive tract. Guidelines are not a substitute for physicians’ opinion on individual patients. Final decision on an intervention should always be based on local expertise and patient preferences.

All recommendations follow a rigorous process based on a systematic review of medical literature as outlined by the National Academy of Medicine (formerly Institute of Medicine) standards for guideline development.

Whenever possible, guidelines are based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methodology.

Panels consist of content experts, stakeholders from other specialties, patient representatives, and members of the ASGE Standards of Practice (SOP) Committee.

Each recommendation is based on consideration of the best medical literature, the balance between risks and benefits, cost-effectiveness, patients’ values, and equity.

Panel members provide ongoing conflict of interest (COI) disclosures, including intellectual conflicts of interest, throughout the development and publication of all guidelines in accordance with the ASGE Policy for Managing Declared Conflicts of Interests.

ASGE strives to provide clinically relevant and practical recommendations, which can help standardize patient care and improve outcomes.

If you have any questions or suggestions, please contact Customer Support at Info@asge.org.

The following information is intended only to provide general information and not as a definitive basis for diagnosis or treatment in any particular case. It is very important that you consult your doctor about your specific condition.

Newly Published

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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GRADE Guidelines

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Content created : Jun 26, 2017, 23:00 PM
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Upper GI

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
Select a choice : Keep
Content created : Jun 26, 2017, 23:00 PM
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Lower GI

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
Select a choice : Keep
Content created : Jun 26, 2017, 23:00 PM
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Biliary and Pancreatic Endoscopy

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Content created : Jun 26, 2017, 23:00 PM
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Adverse Events

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Privileging and Credentialing

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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GI Endoscopy Unit Operations

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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PIIS2468448117300504
Screening and Surveillance in Premalignant Conditions

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Procedural Management in Endoscopy

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Miscellaneous

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Guidelines in Spanish

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
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Content created : Jun 26, 2017, 23:00 PM
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In Progress Guidelines

ASGE Guideline on the Role of Endoscopy in the Management of Malignant Hilar Obstruction

Early 2021

ASGE Guideline on the Management of Cholangitis

Early 2021

ASGE guideline on screening for pancreatic cancer in individuals with genetic susceptibility

Estimated 2021

ASGE Guideline on the Role of Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in the Management of Esophageal and Gastric Mucosal Neoplasia

Estimated 2021

Quality in Endoscopy

Quality documents define the indicators of high-quality endoscopy and how to measure it. ASGE quality indicators are based on a rigorous review process which results in valid metrics for evaluating GI endoscopic procedures. 

Quality in Endoscopy

Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

Jul 5, 2017, 14:32 PM
Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has generated programming to assist physicians and allied healthcare professionals in understanding how to translate quality concepts into practice. With this work, we now have a stronger sense of how to measure quality at the patient and procedural level. A critical component of high-quality endoscopy services relates to the site of the procedure: the endoscopy unit. Unlike many procedure-associated quality indicators, evidenced-based indicators used to measure the quality of endoscopy units are lacking. Outside of the United States, the United Kingdom’s National Health Services developed the Global Rating Scale (GRS) in 20046 with the dual aims of enhancing quality while developing uniformity in endoscopy unit processes and operations. This scoring system was the first to assess service at the level of the endoscopy unit and has been instrumental in reducing wait times, identifying service gaps, increasing patient satisfaction, and reducing adverse events within endoscopy units in the United Kingdom.7 Additionally, the GRS has demonstrated that measuring an endoscopy unit parameter repeatedly and incorporating it into a quality improvement program leads to improvement for many indicators.6, 7, 8 Use of the GRS has spread with modification and adoption for use in other countries across Europe8, 9 and Canada.10, 11 However, there are limitations with the GRS. Whether improvements in 1 particular indicator are correlated with other areas of endoscopy unit performance and outcomes cannot be ascertained from the GRS data. Also, the process for developing and reaching consensus on the GRS indicators has varied extensively in their rigor and breadth of stakeholder participation. To date, no such effort to identify and promote endoscopy unit–level quality indicators has been performed in the United States. A compendium of quality indicators for endoscopy units in the United States is needed to strengthen programming around the promotion of quality and to give endoscopy units an organizational framework within which they can direct their efforts. As healthcare reimbursement in the United States becomes more dependent upon demonstration of performance and quality, endoscopists, governing organizations, payers, and patients will be looking for guidance on endoscopy unit–wide performance. Consequently, the ASGE convened a taskforce whose primary objectives were to (1) develop a comprehensive document that identifies key quality indicators for endoscopy units as defined by the literature and expert opinion and (2) achieve consensus on these quality indicators from important stakeholders involved in endoscopy unit operations and quality improvement
ASGE Endoscopy Unit Quality Indicator Taskforce, Lukejohn W. Day, MD, Jonathan Cohen, MD, FASGE, David Greenwald, MD, FASGE, Bret T. Petersen, MD, FASGE, Nancy S. Schlossberg, BSN, RN, Joseph J. Vicari, MD, MBA, FASGE, Audrey H. Calderwood, MD, FASGE, Frank J. Chapman, MBA, Lawrence B. Cohen, MD, Glenn Eisen, MD, MPH, FASGE, Patrick D. Gerstenberger, MD, FASGE, Ralph David Hambrick III, RN, John M. Inadomi, MD, Donald MacIntosh, MD, Justin L. Sewell, MD, MPH, Roland Valori, MD
Title : Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units
Doi org link : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vgie.2017.02.007
Volume : VideoGIE June 2017, Volume 2, Issue 6, Pages 119-140
URL : http://www.videogie.org/article/S2468-4481(17)30050-4/fulltext
Select a choice : Keep
Content created : Jun 26, 2017, 23:00 PM
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  • Quality & Safety
  • Quality in Endoscopy
  • Quality Indicators
  • VideoGIE Journal
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PIIS2468448117300504

Technology Assessments

Technology evaluations provide a review of existing, new, or emerging endoscopic technologies that have an impact on the practice of GI endoscopy. Evaluations are based on a literature review and a search of the MAUDE (U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Devices and Radiological Health) database to identify the reported adverse events of a given technology. When financial guidance is indicated, the most recent coding data and list prices at the time of publication are provided.

Technology Assessments
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