Search Results

  • Colorectal cancer screening: Recommendations for physicians and patients from the U.S. Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is the process of detecting early-stage CRCs and precancerous lesions in asymptomatic people with no prior history of cancer or precancerous lesions. The U.S. Multi-Society Task Force of Colorectal Cancer (MSTF) is a panel of expert gastroenterologists representing the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Gastroenterological Association, and the Amer…
  • The role of endoscopy in subepithelial lesions of the GI tract

    Subepithelial lesions (SELs) of the GI tract are tumors that originate from the muscularis mucosa, submucosa, or muscularis propria. The term subepithelial lesion is preferred to the term submucosal tumor, which should be reserved for those that originate from the submucosal layer. SELs are most commonly found in the stomach, as often as 1 in every 300 endoscopies.2 They usually are identified dur…
  • Guidelines for sedation and anesthesia in GI endoscopy

    This document is an update of guidelines for sedation and anesthesia in endoscopy prepared by the Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed from January 1980 through August 2017 that related to the topic of “sedation and anesthesia for gastrointestinal …
  • Endoscopic eradication therapy for patients with Barrett’s esophagus–associated dysplasia and intramucosal cancer

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is defined by the replacement of the normal squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus with metaplastic intestinal-type columnar epithelium.1, 2, 3 BE is an adverse event of chronic GERD and the only identifiable premalignant condition for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a cancer that continues to increase in incidence. In 2014 there were approximately 18,170 incident ca…
  • Quality indicators for gastrointestinal endoscopy units

    Significant efforts have been dedicated to defining what constitutes high-quality endoscopy. These efforts, centered on developing, refining, and implementing procedure-associated quality indicators1, 2, 3, 4, 5 have been helpful in promoting best practices among endoscopists and providing evidence-based care for our patients. At the same time, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (…
  • The role of industry representatives in the endoscopy unit

    The modern endoscopy unit is a busy workplace environment. With the patient as the main focus of activity, providers and staff engage in delivering endoscopic services on a daily basis, ranging from basic general endoscopic procedures in an Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) to the most advanced complex interventions performed at tertiary academic medical centers.
  • Informed consent for GI endoscopy

    Over the last 50 years, informed consent has undergone a transformation from an ethical concept to a legal doctrine. It is based on the ethical principles of self determination and autonomy.2 Courts and juries may find physician liability based on the failure to obtain adequate informed consent.3-5 Historically, physicians have had the primary responsibility to disclose to patients the patient’s d…
  • Development of quality indicators for endoscopic eradication therapies in Barrett’s esophagus: the TREAT-BE (Treatment with Resection and Endoscopic Ablation Techniques for Barrett’s Esophagus) Consortium

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is the only identifiable precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a malignancy that is associated with an increasing incidence and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 15% to 20%.1-3 BE is characterized by the replacement of normal squamous epithelium of the distal esophagus with metaplastic intestinal-type columnar epithelium.4,5 The presumed step-wise progression of BE …
  • Recommendations on fecal immunochemical testing to screen for colorectal neoplasia: a consensus statement by the US Multi-Society Task Force on colorectal cancer

    The use of the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is supported by randomized trials demonstrating effectiveness in cancer prevention and widely recommended by guidelines for this purpose. The fecal immunochemical test (FIT), as a direct measure of human hemoglobin in stool has a number of advantages relative to conventional FOBT and is increasingly used relative t…
  • Defining and measuring quality in endoscopy

    Quality has been a key focus for gastroenterology, driven by a common desire to promote best practices among gastroenterologists and to foster evidence-based care for our patients. The movement to define and then measure aspects of quality for endoscopy was sparked by public demand arising from alarming reports about medical errors. Two landmark articles published in 2000 and 2001 led to a nationa…